Several clinical studies have shown the benefits provided by the Rehametrics software platform in the rehabilitation of patients in both clinical and home settings. These studies have shown that applying quantification, gamification and evidence-based clinical elements to rehabilitation can improve outcomes and treatment efficiency.

 

Scientific Journals

1. Lu, Penades, Blasco, J. Chirivella, Gagliardo. Evaluation of Kinect2 based balance measurement. Neurocomputing, Volume 208, October 2016 (290-298).

2. Blasco, J. Chirivella, Gagliardo, Ferreiro, Izquierdo, Penadés, Taylor. Comparison between traditional physiotherapy and the combination of traditional treatment with virtual reality. Brain Injury, 2016; 30 (5-6): 481-817

3. Blasco, J. Chirivella, Gagliardo, C. Chirivella, Penadés, Taylor. Comparison between traditional neuropsychology treatment and the combination of traditional treatment with virtual reality. Brain Injury, 2016; 30 (5-6): 481-817

4. Blasco, J. Chirivella, Gagliardo, C. Chirivella, Penadés, Taylor. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG), virtual reality (VR) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) in a case of cognitive impairment related to Parkinson’s disease. Brain Injury, 2016; 30 (5-6): 481-817

5. Gagliardo, Ferreiro, Izquierdo, Penadés, J. Chirivella, Mas. NeuroAtHome: A software platform of clinical videogames specifically designed for the motor rehabilitation of stroke patients. Brain Injury, 2014; 28 (5-6): 517-878

6. J. Chirivella, del Barco, Blasco, Penadés, Gagliardo, Mas. NeuroAtHome: A software platform of clinical videogames specifically designed for the cognitive rehabilitation of stroke patients. Brain Injury, 2014; 28 (5-6): 517-878

7. Izquierdo, del Barco, Ferreiro, Blasco, Gagliardo, Penadés, J. Chirivella. Use of a home-based telerehabilitation platform for motor and cognitive treatment of a patient with progressive spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA-7): a case report. Brain Injury, 2014; 28 (5-6): 517-878

8. Larson, Feigon, Dvorkin, Gagliardo. Virtual reality and cognitive rehabilitation: A review of current outcome research. NeuroRehabilitation 2014 (06/2014).

 

Scientific Congresses

1. Olmo, Enguer, Blasco. Effect of the NeuroAtHome platform versus traditional treatment in neuromuscular conditions. LXVIII Conference of the Spanish Neurological Society.

2. Blasco, J. Chirivella, C. Chirivella, Manso, Gagliardo, Penadés, Taylor. Symposium: Using virtual reality and gamification in daily clinical rehabilitation practice.. I Iberoamerican Congress on Neuropsychology.

3. Blasco, J. Chirivella, C. Chirivella, Manso, Gagliardo, Penadés, Taylor. Using virtual reality in cognitive rehabilitation after stroke. I Iberoamerican Congress on Neuropsychology.

4. Blasco, J. Chirivella, C. Chirivella, Manso, Gagliardo, Penadés, Taylor. Using virtual reality in memory and self-care for individuals with a toxic-metabolic syndrome. I Iberoamerican Congress on Neuropsychology.

5. Blasco, J. Chirivella, C. Chirivella, Manso, Gagliardo, Penadés, Taylor. Gamificaition and motivation in attentional and functional rehabilitation after a traumatic brain injury. I Iberoamerican Congress on Neuropsychology.

6. Blasco, J. Chirivella, C. Chirivella, Manso, Gagliardo, Penadés, Taylor. Virtual reality program for the treatment of mild cognitive impairments assessed with a qEEG. I Iberoamerican Congress on Neuropsychology.

7. Blasco, Mas, Chirivella, Gagliardo, Penadés, Izquierdo, Ferreiro, Sanchis, Morera. Virtual reality in upper extremity rehabilitation after stroke. LXVII Conference of the Spanish Neurological Society.

8. Blasco, Mas, Sanchis, Morera, Gagliardo, Penadés, Chirivella, del Barco, Chirivella. Outcome comparison between a treatment based on traditional cognitive therapy and a treatment combining traditional cognitive therapy with natural interfaces for the rehabilitation of patients with an acquired brain injury. LXVI Conference of the Spanish Neurological Society.

9. Blasco, Sanchis, Mas, Morera, Gagliardo, Penadés, Chirivella, Ferreiro, Izquierdo. Outcome comparison between a treatment based on traditional physical therapy and a treatment combining traditional physical therapy with natural interfaces for the rehabilitation of patients with an acquired brain injury. LXVI Conference of the Spanish Neurological Society.

10. Castilla, Gómez, López, Berra. Efficacy of a virtual rehabilitation treatment in unstable geriatric patients with mild cognitive impairments. LXVI Conference of the Spanish Neurorehabilitation Society.

 

Many more studies have shown the suitability of gamification to train physical and cognitive aspects in the elderly or in individuals with different health conditions. Rehametrics has brought together the elements of these previous studies that have demonstrated their effectiveness in a single software platform specifically designed for rehabilitation.

Here you will find some of the main studies that have already been published in specialized journals:

 

1. Guderian, B., et al., The cardiovascular and metabolic responses to Wii Fit video game playing in middle-aged and older adults. J Sports Med Phys Fitness, 2010. 50: p. 436-442.

 

2. Hochgraeber, I., et al., Video game consoles introduced in geriatric nursing homes. Competitive bowling with Wii. Pflege Z, 2010. 63: p. 479-481.

 

3. Nacke, L., A. Nacke, and C. Lindley, Brain training for silver gamers: effects of age and game form on effectiveness, efficiency, self-assessment, and gameplay experience. Cyberpsychol Behav, 2009. 12: p. 493-499.

 

4. Langhorne, P., F. Coupar, and A. Pollock, Motor recovery after stroke: a systematic review. Lancet Neurol, 2009. 8: p. 741-754.

 

5. Dobkin, B., Training and exercise to drive poststroke recovery. Nat Clin Pract Neurol, 2008. 4: p. 76-85.

 

6. Kwakkel, G., et al., Effects of augmented exercise therapy time after stroke: a meta-analysis. Stroke, 2004. 35: p. 2529-2539.

 

7. Van der Lee, J., et al., Exercise therapy for arm function in stroke patients:a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Clin Rehabil 2001. 15: p. 20-31.

 

8. Bach y Rita, P., et al., Computer assisted motivating rehabilitation for institutional, home, and educational late stroke programs. Top Stroke Rehabil, 2002. 8: p. 1-10.

 

9. Ferguson, J. and C. Trombly, The effect of added-purpose and meaningful occupation on motor learning. Am J Occup Ther, 1997. 51: p. 508-515.

 

10. Wood, S., et al., Motivating, game-based stroke rehabilitation: a brief report. Topics  Stroke Rehabil, 2003. 10: p. 134-40.

 

11. Lange, B., S. Flynn, and A. Rizzo, Game-based telerehabilitation. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med, 2009. 45: p. 143-151.

 

12. Warburton DE, B.S., Horita LT, Zbogar D, Scott JM, Esch BT, Rhodes RE, The health benefits of interactive video game exercise. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab, 2007. 32: p. 655-663.

 

13. Anderson, F., M. Annett, and W. Bischof, Lean on Wii: physical rehabilitation with virtual reality Wii peripherals. Stud Health Technol Inform, 2010. 154: p. 229-34.

 

14. Deutsch, J., et al., Use of a low-cost, commercially available gaming console (Wii) for rehabilitation of an adolescent with cerebral palsy. Phys Ther, 2008. 88: p. 1196-207.

 

15. Golomb, M., et al., In-home virtual reality videogame telerehabilitation in adolescents with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 2010. 91: p. 1-8.e1.

 

16. Jannink, M., et al., A low cost video game applied for training of upper limb extremity function in children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study. Cyberpsychol Behav, 2008. 11: p. 27-31.

 

17. Huber, M., et al., Feasibility of modified remotely monitored in-home gaming technology for improving hand function in adolescents with cerebral palsy. IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed, 2010. 14: p. 526-34.

 

18. Yong Joo, L., et al., A feasibility study using interactive commercial off-the-shelf computer gaming in upper limb rehabilitation in patients after stroke. J Rehabil Med, 2010. 42: p. 437-441.

 

19. Yavuzer, G., et al., Playstation eyetoy games improve upper extremity-related motor functioning in subacute stroke: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med, 2008. 44: p. 237-44.

 

20. Granek, J., D. Gorbet, and L. Sergio, Extensive video-game experience alters cortical networks for complex visuomotor transformations. Cortex, 2010. 46: p. 1165-1177.

 

21. Donohue, S., M. Woldorff, and S. Mitroff, Video game players show more precise multisensory temporal processing abilities. Atten Percept Psychophys, 2010. 72: p. 1120-1129.

 

22. Hubert-Wallander, B., C. Green, and D. Bavelier, Stretching the limits of visual attention: The case of action video games. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:  Cognitive Science, in press; Article first published online: 17 Nov 2010.

 

23. Green, C. and D. Bavelier, Action-video-game experience alters the spatial resolution of vision. Psychol. Sci, 2007. 18: p. 88-94.

 

24. Dye, M., C. Green, and D. Bavelier, Increasing speed of processing with action video games. Curr Dir Psychol Sci, 2009. 18: p. 321-326.

 

25. Boot, W., et al., The effects of video game playing on attention, memory, and executive control. Acta Psychol (Amst), 2008. 129: p. 387-398.

 

26. Colzato, L.S., et al., DOOM’d to switch: superior cognitive flexibility in players of first person shooter games. Frontiers in Psychology, 2010. 1: p. 1-5.

 

27. Karle, J.W., S. Watter, and J. Shedden, Task switching in video game players: Benefits of selective attention but not resistance to proactive interference. Acta Psychol (Amst), 2010. 134: p. 70-78.

 

28. Dustman, R., et al., The effects of videogame playing on neuropsychological performance of elderly individuals. J Gerontol 1992. 47: p. 168-171.

 

29. Goldstein, J., et al., Video games and the elderly. Soc Behav Pers 1997. 25: p. 345-352.

 

30. Clark, J., A. Lanphear, and C. Riddick, The effects of videogame playing on the response selection processing of elderly adults. J Gerontol, 1987. 42: p. 82-85.

 

31. Farris, M., et al., Evaluation of computer games’ impact upon cognitively impaired frail elderly, in Electronic tools for social work practice and education. H. Resnick, Editor. 1994, Haworth Press: Haworth (UK). p. 219-28.

 

32. Drew, B. and J. Waters, Video games: utilization of a novel strategy to improve perceptual motor skills and cognitive functioning in the noninstitutionalized elderly. Cognit Rehabil, 1986. 4: p. 26-31.

 

33. Weisman, S., Computer games for the frail elderly. Gerontologist, 1983. 23: p. 361-363.

 

34. McGuire, F., Improving the quality of life for residents of long term care facilities through video games. Activities, Adaptation & Aging, 1984. 6: p. 1-7.